Bringing a New Pet Home?

Bringing a New Pet Home?

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Adopting a new dog, cat or puppy is very exciting, but there are also many things to think about and consider leading up to the adoption and preparing to introduce your new dog to your home and any other dogs you already love.

First, you need to prepare by getting some supplies. Even if you already have dogs or cats at home, you will need some supplies that are just for your new puppy or kitty to make him feel at home.

New Dog 1st Day Necessities

  • Well-balanced and nutritious food
  • Food and water bowls
  • Collar
  • Leash
  • ID tag
  • Crate and crate mat
  • Bed
  • Poop bags
  • Treats
  • Chews: like rawhides, bones, nylabones, stuffable Kongs
  • Toys: a few to get him started and see how he likes to play best

Training Supplies

  • Training treats
  • Clicker
  • Poochie Bells (for housebreaking)
  • Training collar if you want to train this way
  • You may want to consider finding a trainer, but spending 30 minutes a day training your new dog yourself will do wonders!

Grooming Supplies

  • Brush (if your dog is a shedder, you may want a Furminator to use monthly and a Kong Mit for daily/weekly use)
  • Shampoo and conditioner
  • Nail clippers and styptic powder
  • Toothbrush and/or dental chews
  • Ear cleaner

Appointments and Medical Needs

  • Schedule a check-up with your vet
  • Schedule a microchipping
  • Get a flea and tick product

Items to Keep Your Home and Car Clean

  • Simple Solution
  • Non-toxic cleaning products
  • Kurgo car covers/hammock
  • Dirty Dog Mat
  • Tall Tails Pocket Towel
  • Towels and paper towels

Other Things to Consider

  • Pet gate
  • Food bin for storage/freshness
  • Outdoor shelter
  • Travel crate
  • Jacket or sweater if your dog gets cold easily

New Puppy 1st Day Necessities

  • Well-balanced and nutritious food
  • Food and water bowls
  • Collar
  • Leash
  • ID tag
  • Crate and crate mat
  • Bed
  • Poop bags
  • Treats
  • Chews: like rawhides, bones, nylabones, stuffable Kongs
  • Toys: a few to get him started and see how he likes to play best

Training Supplies

  • Training treats
  • Clicker
  • Poochie Bells (for housebreaking)
  • Pee pads
  • You may want to consider finding a trainer, but spending 30 minutes a day training your new puppy yourself will do wonders!

Grooming Supplies

  • Brush (if your dog is a shedder, you may want a Furminator to use monthly and a Kong Mit for daily/weekly use)
  • Shampoo and conditioner
  • Nail clippers and styptic powder
  • Toothbrush and/or dental chews
  • Ear cleaner

Appointments and Medical Needs

  • Schedule a check-up with your vet
  • Schedule a microchipping
  • Get a flea and tick product
  • Schedule/plan for spay or neuter around 6 months old

Items to Keep Your Home and Car Clean

  • Simple Solution
  • Non-toxic cleaning products
  • Kurgo car covers/hammock
  • Dirty Dog Mat
  • Tall Tails Pocket Towel
  • Towels and paper towels

Other Things to Consider

  • Pet gate
  • Food bin for storage/freshness
  • Outdoor shelter
  • Travel crate
  • Jacket or sweater if your puppy gets cold easily

New Cat or Kitten 1st Day Necessities

  • Well-balanced and nutritious food
  • Food and water bowls
  • Collar
  • ID tag
  • Litter box and scooper
  • Litter
  • Treats (cats like treats, too!)
  • Toys: Cat Dancer Wand for exercise and health (my cats also like to chase laser pointers!)

Grooming Supplies

  • Brush (if needed a Kong Mitt would be a great option)
  • Nail clippers and styptic powder
  • Scratch pad (good for nails/saves your furniture)
  • Toothbrush and/or dental chews
  • Ear cleaner

Appointments and Medical Needs

  • Schedule a check-up with your vet
  • Schedule a microchipping
  • Get a flea and tick product
  • Schedule/plan for spay or neuter around 6 months old

Items to Keep Your Home Clean

  • Simple Solution
  • Non-toxic cleaning products

Other Things to Consider

  • Cat door
  • Food bin for storage/freshness
  • Outdoor shelter (if indoor/outdoor cat)
  • Travel crate
  • Bed (some cats like them, and some cats like the back of the sofa or the top of your computer)
  • Catnip!

Here are some guidelines to follow when you bring your new dog or puppy home for the first time. Remember to be patient, and remember that consistency in training is key!!

In the First Days After Adopting Your New Dog:

  • Your new dog is coming into an unfamiliar environment. He may not automatically realize what a wonderful home you have for him…so be patient (even if he forgets his housebreaking training once or twice).
  • Get all of your new dog supplies before bringing your dog home-especially a leash, collar, and ID tag. Your new pup may try to dart if he is a little scared or skittish.
  • Give your dog a space that is all his own, a crate, bed, or a gated off room at first, and praise him when he uses it.
  • Dog-proof your home! If you are bringing home a puppy, he will probably chew on things...and even older dogs may be chewers-you won’t know at first. So remove all cords, plants, cleaning products, rugs, and anything else that he may chew on or knock over in the area you designate as his space.
  • Plan to slowly transition your dog to a nutritionally sound food. Find out what he was eating at his previous home/shelter, and ask your local Hollywood Feed associate how to transition him to the food of your choice.
  • Show him where he will be using the bathroom immediately and praise him every time he does. Go outside with him for the first few days to reinforce this behavior.
  • Give attention and positive praise for good behaviors, and immediately stop or ignore bad behaviors (stop him from chewing, jumping, etc., but ignore whining and do not give in. That will only reinforce that behavior).
  • Put your new dog on a schedule right away. This should include regular feedings at least twice a day (don’t leave bowls of food out all the time), playtime, bathroom time, and nap time (which can be crate training time!).
  • It’s okay if your new pup doesn’t seem interested in food for the first day or two-he will eat when his hunger overrides any anxiety or nerves. If he doesn’t eat for more than 3 days, then take him to the vet for a check-up.
  • Work on training daily for about 10-30 minutes, depending on your dog’s attention span.
  • Bring in a trainer or ask Hollywood Feed store associates for training and nutrition tips!
  • If you have kids, make sure they know how to behave around a new dog-this is a necessary life lesson!

You will also need to make plans to introduce your new dog to your other fur babies. Making these plans in advance can make a very big difference in your new dog settling in comfortably and happily, and your dogs accepting a new sibling.

Introducing Your Dog/s To a New Dog Sibling:

  • Introduce any new dog to your dogs in a neutral place. Your dogs may feel possessive of your house or yard and may want to defend it.
  • Have a second adult there to help in case there are any problems.
  • If you know one of the dogs is not great at meeting new friends, exercise them separately beforehand so they’re too tired to have bad behavior.
  • Use leashes, but don’t pull tightly. Instead, hold them loosely only as a precaution.
  • Look for signs of tension or aggression and distract/diffuse the situation early (some signs can be: stiff body, teeth showing, intense focus, or growling-see this website on canine body language from the ASPCA to get more information/tips https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/dog-behavior/canine-body-language)
  • Give positive praise as the dogs sniff each other, or even if they ignore each other with no tension.
  • Once all the pups appear to be getting along and are relaxed, then take them back home. Think about using two cars, or kennel them separately in your car so no fighting occurs while you are driving.
  • Pick up all treats/bones/toys before you bring your new dog home and when they are not being supervised. These are things dogs feel possessive about and may lead to fighting.
  • You may want the dogs to get used to each other through a pet gate/barrier for a few hours or days once you are inside your home.
  • Once home, separate and supervise at feeding times, with any treats or toys, and around beds. Watch the dogs closely for the first few days while your dogs are getting used to their space being invaded by their new sibling.
  • Do not leave the house and leave the dogs alone together, you will want to utilize crates or put them in separate rooms for a while when you are gone.
  • Praise good behaviors all the time!
  • If there are any problem behaviors such as growling or baring teeth, separate the dogs without yelling or acting stressed, and then after a few seconds, let the dogs interact again. They will get over any disagreements very quickly and frequently it is our stress that will set our dogs off or prolong negative behaviors.

 

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